Categories
Uncategorized

The God Who is in Charge

Author: Rachel Kidd

Objective: To learn how God uses the circumstances of our lives to prepare us for the role He has for us.

The Story of Joseph

Unlike most biblical characters who reveal their humanity and brokenness as their story develops, Joseph remains pure of heart and soul. Along with Daniel, he is one of the purest characters in the bible, remaining faithful and constant to the end, despite the horrors he faced.

Because he was the favored first-born son of Rachel, the favorite and beloved wife of Jacob, Joseph was his father’s favorite child. As you can imagine, this created incredible resentment in his older brothers who likely saw their father’s disdain for their mother Leah. The resentment grew for their little brother as he did. They contemplated his murder, but ultimately, they sold him into slavery, to a traveling caravan that took young Joseph away from his home and off to Egypt.

Joseph found himself in a foreign land against his will, first as a slave, then as a prisoner, and then by divine providence, he found himself second in command over Egypt as prime minister, directly under the Pharaoh himself.

God’s Providence

Joseph lived an extraordinary life in Egypt, despite the mistreatment and pain, something he knew was only due to God’s hand. He was strategically placed in a position of power because God knew a famine would come that had the potential to decimate the Jewish people. Without Joseph in this powerful seat, with his careful planning and preparation and connection to his people, God’s people might not have survived.

This powerful conclusion to the incredible story of Joseph’s life, covered in fourteen chapters in the book of Genesis, is really a chronicle of God’s providence. A New Testament verse sums up the story of Joseph incredibly well.

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose. -Romans 8:28

God’s plans ultimately work together for good, despite how difficult things may seem at the moment. Joseph was sold into slavery by his brothers, mistreated, and experienced some of the worst experiences life has to offer, yet his faith never wavered, and God’s purpose ultimately proved to be for good.

Joseph’s loving response to persecution was, “You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives” (Genesis 50:20).

Joseph’s story teaches us about the providence of God and confirms what Romans 8:28 declares, that there is no situation so bad God cannot redeem it and bring good from it.

God’s Grace

The story of Joseph also tells us of God’s grace, given freely to those who ask but do not deserve. It begins with Joseph’s father, Jacob, who was blessed in many ways.

Jacob long believed that his blessings were earned, won by his cunning, his scheming, and his own effort. He was, after all, the younger brother who conned his elder brother Esau out of his inheritance. He was also the man who wrestled with God, who worked long years for the bride he desired, and then more after marrying the wrong sister.

His blessings of children, land, and wives were not because of his own doings, they were undeserved blessings from God who was using Jacob for His divine plans.

We see Jacob’s recognition of this later in life when he reconnects with his brother Esau. He connects the grace of Esau’s welcome, after all he had done to his older brother, to the grace shown to him by God. He realizes that God gave him blessings he did not earn nor deserve and that he should in turn give freely, especially to his own brother.

“For I have seen your face, which is like seeing the face of God, and you have accepted me. Please accept my blessing that is brought to you, because God has dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough.” Thus he urged him, and he took it.” –Genesis 33:10-11

Joseph’s story illustrates this same truth in another way. He experienced the worst life has to offer, not because he deserved it or as a punishment, but because of circumstances beyond his control, for the glory of God.

By the grace of God, Joseph was called to live an incredibly hard life, one I could hardly imagine surviving. But it was because God was preparing him, training him through experiences in such a way to be strategically placed to save his people from extinction.

How does this apply to me?

Looking at the relationship Joseph has with his family, we can see an imperfect model. His father favors one son over the others, not to mention the daughters who are excluded from the narrative entirely. He allows anger and resentment to fester within his home, among his children, and his multiple wives, creating a chaotic environment that leads to losing his son Joseph for years.

Clearly, Jacob’s home and family are not one to model ours after. It’s an example of what not to do in so many ways, like a floundering family on a reality tv show where a nanny steps in to save the day.

But the truth is, we all have human, flawed, and imperfect parents. None of us were raised in perfect homes, no matter how happy our childhoods may have been. Maybe we hold hurt from childhood, resentment for the way we were parented (or not parented), and wounds that still impact us today. It can be incredibly difficult to let those hurts go and to forgive our parents, especially if we don’t think they deserve it.

The grace that Joseph shows his family is an incredible model for us today. How painful must that have been to be confronted with the brothers who sold you into slavery as a teenager? Who set an incredibly traumatic chain of events in motion that permanently altered the course of your life? And then you’re expected to use your power to help them?

I honestly would have a difficult time showing them grace. But Joseph models for us grace and forgiveness, welcoming his family and sharing the stores of food with them, despite all they had done to harm him. And that is the root of the story of Joseph; divine grace to those who do not deserve it.

Share this post in your networks: