Categories
Christian History Spiritual Development

The Principles of Deliverance

Author: Rachel Kidd

The Story of Exodus

Objective: To understand that there is no such thing as salvation without the power of God.

“The LORD is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation. He is my God, and I will praise him… and I will exalt him.” — Exodus 15:2

God’s power is uniquely displayed in the book of Exodus, which fittingly means way out. It tells the story of the Israelites’ deliverance from slavery in Egypt at the hands of Pharaoh while providing parallels to help us understand our relationship to sin and God’s ability to deliver us from it.

Deliverance

The theme of the book of Exodus is deliverance, which also means salvation, particularly in the Old Testament. We see the power of God through the salvation or deliverance of the Israelites through the plagues.

Each time Pharaoh rejected Moses and Aaron’s plea to let the Israelites go, God sent a plague on Egypt —ten in all. Everything from blood in the Nile, to hordes of locusts, frogs, lice, and flies, and finally the death of every firstborn plagued the Egyptians. After every plague, Moses and his brother Aaron come to Pharaoh and ask for the freedom of their people, in the name of the Lord. And every time, Pharaoh refused to let the Israelites go, his heart hardened.

These plagues are crucial to the story of Exodus because they convey a great truth; that God is far greater than any earthly power, even the most powerful Pharaoh at the height of Egypt’s power and influence.

He who is in you is greater than he who is in the world. —1 John 4:4

God’s power is greater than any found on earth, not a president, army, prime minister, or king. The plagues are clear evidence of this, causing the most powerful country of the time to crumble and its leader to fall to his knees, allowing this small group of enslaved people to be free.

Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron at night. He said, “Get up and go away from my people, both you and the people of Israel. Go and worship the Lord, as you have said. Take your flocks and your cattle, as you have said, and go. And pray that good will come to me also.” –Exodus 12: 31-32

Ultimately, the plagues serve to persuade Pharoah and the Egyptians, urging them to free these enslaved people and demonstrating the mighty power of God.

The Slavery of Sin

The dialogue between Moses and Pharaoh can also be seen as an illustration of the dynamic between our deliverer Jesus and Satan, who holds people in bondage, or the eternal conflict between good and evil.

God allows evil to exist to demonstrate His power to defeat it, because what is goodness without the existence of evil? Like a fine jeweler displaying their most glorious gems on a dark velvet background so they stand out, God uses sin and evil to emphasize His goodness and purity. Evil ultimately serves the purposes of God, as difficult as that is to reconcile.

An example of this can be found in this story in Exodus. God purposely hardened Pharaoh’s heart, not permitting him to let the Israelites go until the plagues escalated to death. God called Moses and Aaron to go to Pharaoh each time, asking to be set free, knowing the answer would still be a resounding “no.”

“You will speak all that I tell you. Your brother Aaron will tell Pharaoh to let the people of Israel leave his land. But I will make Pharaoh’s heart hard. So, I will do many powerful works for the people to see in the land of Egypt.” —Exodus 7: 2-3

A Deal with the Devil

As we look at the dialogue between Moses and Pharaoh, we can see what is involved in our salvation and deliverance, understanding Moses as Jesus and Pharaoh as Satan.

Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron and said, “Go and give a gift in worship to your God here in the land.” But Moses said, “It is not right to do this. For the Egyptians hate what we would give in worship to the Lord our God. If the Egyptians see us giving this gift and doing what they think is sinful, will they not throw stones at us? We must travel three days to the desert and give a gift in worship to the Lord our God, as He tells us to do.”

So, Pharaoh said, “I will let you go, so you may give a gift to the Lord your God. But do not go very far away. Pray for me.” Then Moses said, “I am leaving you. I will pray to the Lord that the many flies may leave Pharaoh and his servants and his people tomorrow. But do not let Pharaoh lie again by not letting the people go to give a gift on an altar to the Lord.” —Exodus 25-28

Satan, like Pharaoh, does not mind people being religious as long as they are still worldly, not too “churchy,” or different. They ask that you take faith lightly, to go to church on holidays but stay exactly as you were. They want us to stay in “Egypt” and remain like them, much like non-Christian friends often react to a new convert.

After the devastation of more plagues, Pharoah concedes and says that Israelites may be free, but their children must stay. If Satan cannot get access to you, he will settle for your children if you neglect to support their spiritual development, like the Pharaoh attempted to do with the Israelite children.

And after even more plagues, Pharoah concedes once more and says the Israelites can be free if they leave their livestock, the ancient equivalent of money and property. Likewise, if Satan cannot have you, he will go after your aspirations and love of money. Perhaps he can tempt you away from a calling to missions, instead drawing you into the entertainment industry and the potential of fame and fortune.

Ultimately, Satan and Pharoah are compelling and deceptive. But, God and Jesus, the deliverer, are infinitely more powerful and are the conquerors in the end.

To be free from the bondage of sin, like the bondage of the ancient Israelites in Egypt, we need a miracle of God. He devastated Pharaoh and the Egyptians with plagues, He parted the Red Sea for their escape, and He provided manna to eat as they wandered the desert.

In the same way, Jesus defeated our enemy- sin. He provided a way out of sin, and He gives us what we need to live.

Categories
Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

Humility God’s Way

Author: Charles Hegwood

“My how the mighty have fallen,” is a phrase that you may have heard growing up. I often heard it when someone in a high position would fall, be dethroned or get taken down. The phrase often means to convey someone justly being humbled. This phrase has a mocking tone rather than a redemptive one. So, what does scripture say about humility?

Well, scripture says that God ‘humbles the proud.’ You will find themes of mighty kings falling because of their pride. He humbles righteously and for a purpose. He humbles His enemies in justice. He humbles His people to set them on the right path, His path. Today we are going to specifically look at Moses’ story. We will see that God teaches Moses humility by removing Him from a high position and authority so that he realizes that he can do nothing without God’s help.

God Humbles the Proud

When we are first introduced to Moses, it is in a time of struggle. Egypt is killing all the Hebrew boys. Moses, by the grace of God, is found floating in a basket by none other than the Pharaoh’s daughter. He then grew up in the household of Pharaoh and was educated and given authority. At some point in the story Moses recognized that God’s people, his people, were being unjustly treated. He made an attempt at rescuing a Hebrew who was being beaten by an Egyptian.

However, all he managed to do was kill the Egyptian. His arrogance was attempting to rescue God’s people his way. It did not work. The next day, two Hebrews were fighting, upon seeing Moses, they asked him snarkily if he would kill them too. This had to sting a bit. He certainly thought that he would have been seen as a hero and savior. However, they only saw Moses like the other Egyptian overseers. So, Moses fled in fear. The mighty had fallen. It was here that God would begin to work.

The Beginning of Humility

Moses found himself sitting in the wilderness alone and afraid. However, God was with him, even though he didn’t know it yet. His position and authority were gone. So was his pride. He had nothing left to be prideful about. However, being made humble is only the first step of the process. True humility comes from understanding that you can do nothing without God. Moses is not there yet.

For example, a scene unfolded in front of him with shepherds who were chasing away women at a well. Moses the protector sprung into action and chased away the shepherds and made sure the women got water. The story closes with Moses getting married to one of the women and living in the tent of the priest of Midian, his father-in-law.

There is some growth in humility here. Moses, who had previously dwelled in the palace now lived in a tent. He had always found his home in Egypt now he found himself living in a land that was not his. We see this feeling of sojourning in his first son’s name. Moses, no longer the man of position and authority, now helped care for a tent- dwelling people in the wilderness and seemed content.

God’s Presence Brings Humility

Moses had lost his power, position, and home. He had failed to rescue his people and now dwelt in a tent. Then God intervened in Moses’ story. God must intervene in our story as well. God showed himself to Moses in the fire of the burning bush. It is in this setting that God said that He would rescue His people that Moses could not rescue.

At first, Moses must have been relieved God was taking the lead on the rescue plan. Then God told Moses that He would use him to do this rescue. Moses argued with God saying that there was no way he could be the right person. Humility is a process and Moses was walking on the path but had yet to reach the destination. As you read through Moses’ exchange with God in chapter 3 you will see that Moses’ humility doubts God’s sovereignty. This is not godly humility. We will get there though.

Even though Moses had not yet arrived, notice what was happening. He was talking with God. I am always amazed at the grace and patience of God speaking to sinful humans. We see this through scripture. As Moses began to learn humility He began to talk with God. He was learning that without God he could do nothing. This is the result of God drawing near to the humbled heart.

The Journey of Humility

As I said before, humility is a journey we take. Moses learned throughout his life and ministry to be humble and trust in God. That does not mean that Moses did not have moments where he acted in his own strength, he did. That does mean we see a pattern of progression towards godly humility.

One of my favorite accounts of this is in Exodus 33:15. After the disastrous idolatry of the golden calf, God called Israel a ‘stiff-necked people’ and that He would not go with them any farther. Moses pleaded with God that if God did not go with them that he would not lead the people. Why? Moses realized that without God, he could not do it. After this intercession is when God’s presence altered Moses’ face. He had humbled himself rightly before God. He was on the path toward growth in godly humility.

Conclusion

Humility is a journey. Moses learned to be humble. Education is a process that takes time and testing. Learning humility was not something Moses mastered in this life. We will never master it perfectly either. We can learn though. We can see that we do not and cannot do anything without the power of God. Once we have come to the end of ourselves, then we may truly begin the journey to godly humility. A humility that looks to God for every breath and action. A humility that says, “I cannot and will not do this without You God.” Moses learned this over a long life of trials. I hope you will too.

Watch this complete lesson here.

Categories
All Digging Deeper into the Word

Digging Deeper: The Story of Moses

Author: Andrew Sargent Ph.D., Contributing Author for Foundations by ICM

 

God on god Violence

When going to Bible college, my professors were wont to say that God’s ten plagues against Egypt were attacks against the gods of Egypt. Did not Yahweh say to Moses in Exodus 12:12, “…on all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments: I am the LORD”? Just as three meant few, forty meant many, and seven was a sacred counting, so also ten plagues, matching the ten fingers on the human hand, did represent a type of fullness… here, a fullness of judgment against Egypt and her gods. When, however, I would ask what Egyptian gods were involved and how the plagues diminished them, I never got more than one or two obvious ones tossed back at me, like “attacking the Nile (Hapi)” and “blocking out the sun (Ra).” They would usually mumble off after those and say to the rest of the class, “Any other questions before we move on?”

So that you don’t have to suffer the same unmet curiosity, let me give you a list.1 When Pharoah boasts, “Who is the LORD, that I should obey his voice and let Israel go?” Yahweh shows Pharaoh exactly who He is. He is the Lord of Lords.

1. The Nile turned to Blood

Hapi was the god of the yearly flooding of the Nile, which was the very source of Egypt’s life. Pharoah made the Hebrews cast their sons to the Nile, and when it was struck with Moses’ staff, it ran red like the blood of those drowned there and devoured by fish and crocodiles. Hapi was often called, “Lord of fish and birds and marshes,” as well as “Lord of the river bringing vegetation.” Everything in the Nile died.

2. Frogs Swarm the Land

Heket is a fertility goddess with the head of a frog. The frog was a fertility symbol. Yahweh makes them fertile indeed. Rather than rising with the Nile they exit from the Nile, swarm the land, and fill Egypt with putrefaction. Though Heket was also “She who hastens birth” it is the Hebrew women worshiping Yahweh alone, who “are not like the Egyptian women, for they are vigorous and give birth before the midwife comes to them.”

3. Lice From the Dust

Geb was the god of the soil, i.e. the dust of the earth. Yahweh “invades his territory” and brings forth lice rather than rice. He is also regarded as the father of snakes, giving a deeper sense to Moses’ staff becoming a serpent and swallowing up the Magicians’ serpent staffs.

4. Swarms of Flies

Uatchit, also called Wadjet, was the goddess of the marshes where papyrus and swarms abound. She is the goddess of the heat of noon which empowers the swarms and was closely associated with the Sun god Ra. She both wore and was the image of Pharoah’s crown, a protector of the land. Yahweh blots out the sun with swarms and devastates the land over which the Swarm goddess stood sentinel.

5. Death of Livestock

The Cow goddess, Hathor, like many Egyptian deities, has a complicated history. She was pictured as a cow or a woman adorned with cow horns. Like other cow goddesses, Hathor is also associated with the sun and sky, and thus the symbolic mother of the Pharaohs. Cows were revered as nurturers and givers of milk. She is symbolically struck down with Yahweh’s plague against the cattle of the land.

6. Ashes Turn to Boils

Isis, the goddess who resurrected her brother, Osiris, had legendary magical powers and is commonly associated with magic spells of healing for everyone, even common people. Here, even Pharaoh’s magicians could not stand before Pharaoh because the boils were tormenting them.

7. Hail and Fire From the Heavens

Exodus 9:23 says, “Moses stretched out his staff toward heaven, and the LORD sent thunder and hail, and fire ran down to the earth.” As with the swarm goddess, when swarms destroy and the frog-headed fertility goddess when frogs overrun and pollute the land, Yahweh “seizes control” over the heavens and rains down lightning and lethal hail. There are a few different sky deities at play here. Primarily, we have Tefnut, goddess of sky moisture, we have Shu, god of winds and air, we have Horus, god of kingship and sky, the spirit of Pharaoh in life, and we have Nut goddess of the sky, a nourisher suckling the world. None can hold back Yahweh’s hand.

8. Locusts Plague From a Strong East Wind

Seth was the ruler of the red land, i.e. the east and west desert regions surrounding the black land of fertile Egypt. As the desert was a protective flank, Seth was thought to play his part in warding off the chaos from Egypt. From “Seth’s desert,” however, Yahweh brings locusts to finish off what remained from the hail.

9. Blocking Out the Sun

Ra, the noon-day sun, ruler of the sky, earth, underworld, and kings. He was divine order and the source of creation. The Egyptians called themselves the cattle of Ra. Yahweh’s penultimate strike was to blacken out all the light of day and night so that painful darkness spread throughout the whole land.

10. Killing the Firstborn

Pharaoh was worshipped as the son of Ra, Horus on earth, and Osiris in death. Not only does Yahweh strike down every firstborn from beast and man, from the lowest servant to the very house of Pharaoh, but here Pharaoh is defeated in his resistance to releasing the labor force of Israel to go their way.

 

Conclusion

God said to Moses in Exodus 7:2-5:

“…tell Pharaoh to let the people of Israel go out of his land. But I will harden Pharaoh’s heart, and though I multiply my signs and wonders in the land of Egypt, Pharaoh will not listen to you. Then I will lay my hand on Egypt and bring my hosts, my people the children of Israel, out of the land of Egypt by great acts of judgment. The Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD, when I stretch out my hand against Egypt and bring out the people of Israel from among them.”

Yahweh did. Egypt did. Pharaoh did. Israel did.

 

1I’ve seen some variation in the list from different scholars, particularly those who mistake Khepri for a fly-headed god, but this is a good list.