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Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

God’s Grace in the Garden

Author: Charles Hegwood

We enter into one of the most sorrowful yet hopeful stories in all of Scripture. This is the Fall in Genesis 3. Questions are likely swirling through your mind as you recall the details of this tragic chapter. Such as, why did God put that tree in the garden in the first place? Why did God allow the serpent in the garden? Who was the serpent? And so, on it goes. What I want to do is look past the ugliness of this chapter and embrace the impossible grace of God in the face of an all-out rebellion by His special creation who we know as Adam and Eve.

If you grew up in church like I did, I encourage you to let go of all you know for one moment and read this chapter with fresh eyes. If you have vaguely read this chapter at some point in the past. That is okay. I welcome you to read it and take in all that is there. As we begin to dig in, I want to highlight the grace of God that is prominently displayed in this chapter. We rebelled and yet God did not abandon us but embraced us and promised a way to redeem us. Let us now look at those acts of grace and shadows of redemption.

The Setup

First, let us look back at all the good that God had given the man and woman. God gave Adam life and spirit. God breathed into him. God planted a garden and placed the man in it. God gave the man a purpose to fill the earth with worshipers who reflect God Himself. Even in the command to not eat of one tree, God was giving the man the offer of a relationship.

If Adam obeyed, then he was reflecting his love to God. All these good, gracious things were mentioned in the previous chapter. Adam had done nothing to create anything or to warrant the favor of God. Chapter 2 drips with God’s love and grace towards Adam, Eve, and by extension us. So let us not lose the wonderful context that precedes the rebellion. The darkness of the Fall is contrasted by the light of God’s goodness.

The Rebellion

The man and woman rebel against God through the eating of the fruit. Back up just a little bit though. We mistakenly assume eating the fruit was the first sin, but that is rash. Before Eve ate the fruit, she thought, “It looks good to me, I don’t know what all the fuss is about. Maybe God is holding back on us. (Paraphrase and added commentary)” The first sin was the thought that maybe she knew what was best for herself; better than God did. That thought sowed the seeds of the act.

Let us back up a little further. Why was the serpent in the garden to begin with? Adam’s responsibility was to take care of the garden as an act of worship to God. If there was a crafty serpent, Adam had the authority from God to remove it. And yet there the serpent was, talking to Eve about the one rule God had given the man. Adam did nothing to stop this. We know by later context, that he was likely right there listening in. He may have even watched Eve pick the fruit. Never did he step in and try to stop it. Adam was not a voice of reason, calling Eve back from the edge of transgression. He did not quell her questioning of God’s goodness. You can see rebellion from every angle.

God’s Grace to the Man and Woman

God could have swooped in after the eating of the fruit and wiped Adam and Eve out. They could have died instantly. God could have come in like an angry father yelling and swinging the belt of justice, but He entered the garden quietly. He asked questions as a father would his disobedient children. This was grace. This was more than they deserved. God calmly spoke to the two people who had just spat in His face with their sins.

God did not mock the covers they had sown to hide their nakedness. The fig leaves did nothing to hide their shame. God one by one, gave them a chance to repent and come clean. Adam blamed God and Eve, and Eve blamed the serpent. Neither of them took responsibility for their actions. God gracefully gave out judgments. This may seem harsh, but consider what God had the right to do. He would have been just to kill them. The judgments were graceful in their promise of life. Eve would experience pain, but would still give new life through childbirth. Adam’s work would be painful and difficult, but they would live a life.

Then something amazing happened. God promised that these judgments would not always be so. Someone was coming that would end the curse they had brought on the earth. The ‘he’ who would strike the serpent would also be wounded. A battle was coming. Throughout the rest of the Old Testament, this image of a coming Redeemer would continue. We know this is fulfilled by Jesus. Even in the ashes of rebellion and judgment, God promised to restore what was broken.

Finally, God did not demand their blood. They did not die, but some animals did. God used animal skins to cover them. This covering was a shadow. The animals died instead of Adam and Eve. The animals’ death covered their nakedness and shame. The shadow here is the promise that someone will die instead of us. We know that is Jesus. He died in our place and His blood covered our sin and rebellion, our shame.

Conclusion

In all these things, the grace of God drips from the pages of the Bible. Far from the angry God, some atheists like to paint in the Old Testament, as this story highlights God’s goodness and grace to sinful people. This grace is only magnified as the story continues into chapter 4.  I invite you to read through the Old Testament and see the grace of God, even in judgment. See the hope in the darkness through the promises found in this chapter. Your eyes will be open to the wonderful truth of God’s love for you.

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