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The Spirit of the Ten Commandments

In the tapestry of human civilization, few threads have woven themselves as deeply into the fabric of societies as the Ten Commandments. These ancient directives, gifted to humanity as the backbone of God’s law, transcend mere rules; they embody the very essence of divine guidance and human flourishing. Yet, as we delve into their significance, we uncover a profound truth: while the Law is a gift that illuminates the path, it is faith in Jesus Christ that truly saves, lest anyone should boast.

Understanding the Purpose of the Law

The Scriptures are filled with insights on the function and purpose of the law. In Romans 3:20, we learn that no one is declared righteous by observing the law; rather, it serves to make us conscious of sin. This sentiment is echoed in Romans 7:7, where Paul acknowledges that he wouldn’t have recognized sin without the law’s guidance. The crux of the matter is made clear in Romans 3:28 and Galatians 2:16, emphasizing that righteousness comes through faith in Jesus, not through legalistic observance.

The Dual Purpose and Benefit of the Law

God’s intention behind the commandments is multifaceted. They are designed to teach humanity how to love God rightly, bring honor and glory to His name, and foster harmonious relationships among people (Matt. 22:40). Additionally, adherence to these commandments leads to blessings and a peaceful life, as stated in Exodus 20:1-17.

The reciprocal benefit for mankind is evident: obeying the law promotes harmony in relationships and peace in the streets. The law is a loving gift that God has revealed to His special creation to know how to love Him and one another. The Ten Commandments are a blessing that if honored will bring peace and a long life. Even if your peace is internal in the midst of external chaos, following God’s instruction leads to true life.

Man wasn’t made for the law; the law was made for man. This is exactly what Jesus meant when he described on many occasions that the spirit of the law was and is for God and man’s benefit, not their detriment. The law is not more important to God than carrying your paralyzed friend on the Sabbath. This breaking of the letter of man’s law was the exact display of love and faith that fulfilled God’s law (Mark 2:3-11).

The Transformative Power of Understanding the Spirit of the Law

Integrating the Old and New Testaments is crucial for a holistic understanding of God’s divine plan. Jesus Himself affirmed the continuity of the law and the prophets, stating that He came not to abolish but to fulfill them (Matthew 5:17). This underscores the significance of interpreting the New Testament in light of the Old, recognizing the timeless principles and moral truths encapsulated in the commandments. We must be careful to rightly interpret and discern the letter of the law as well as the spirit of the law in every area of our lives.

The Law’s Application in Real Life

Jesus’s teachings shed light on the spirit of the law. In Matthew 5 He emphasized the importance of understanding the law’s intent and living accordingly, rather than rigidly following its letter. He exemplified this in His actions, such as healing on the Sabbath, which showcased the primacy of compassion and love over legalistic adherence. In Matthew 22:36-40 Jesus says that all the Law and Prophets can be wrapped up in the essence of loving God and man with all your heart, soul, and strength. It is through Jesus’ indwelling Spirit we are able to live out the spirit of the law, applying it with wisdom and discernment.

The Spirit of the Ten Commandments

In Exodus 20:2, God tells Moses, “I am the LORD your God, who rescued you from the land of Egypt, the place of your slavery.”

The title Lord means judge, authority or ruler. God as Judge is the ultimate authority, law giver and keeper. This God is a perfect and benevolent ruler and rescuer to His people. He reminds Moses of each other’s identity, purpose, and position. The Judge then gives Moses these Ten Commandments to give to His people and to live by them.

  • “You must not have any other god but me Ex 20:3

Honor God as Lord of all (Acts 10:36). Make God primary in all areas and decisions in life. Live by His statutes, ordinances, and law and He will direct your paths.

  • “You must not make for yourself an idol Ex 20:4

Seek God alone for all your needs, desires, and comfort. He is all knowing and powerful and hallowed. He is our Father in Heaven, the only one who can graciously give our daily bread, and forgive us of our sins, and lead us out of temptation (Matthew 6:9-13)

  • “You must not misuse the name of the LORD your God.” Ex 20:7

Live in a manner worthy of your calling (Eph. 4:1). Not that God needs us to help His reputation, but we should live in a way that doesn’t contradict His character, Word or calling on our lives. Beware the way of the hypocrite.

  • “Remember to observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy.” Ex 20:8

There were many man-made laws surrounding God’s law of keeping rest on the sabbath to honor His rest and our health.

  • “Honor your father and mother.” Ex 20:12

As adults, it’s important to maintain respect for our parents by honoring them even when we disagree. Respect, care, and provide for the elderly as they have respected, cared, and provided for you. Parents, strive to live in a manner that earns respect from your children.

  • “You must not murder.” Ex 20:13

The commandment carries a profound message about the sanctity of human life. It urges us to regard life with utmost respect, regardless of circumstances like accidental or intentional harm. The essence is to honor life by exercising self-control and engaging in actions that build and uplift rather than destroy. The literal meaning of the commandment is to not murder with premeditative will. Jesus said that if you harbor anger or resentment in your heart for another person, you are guilty of murder.

  • “You must not commit adultery.” Ex 20:14

Respect and love your spouse and the commitment you’ve made. Flee sexual immorality and be true to yourself and others. If you make a vow, make every effort to keep it.

  • “You must not steal.” Ex 20:15

The eighth commandment prohibits taking what isn’t rightfully ours or harming others through unfair possession of their property. It stresses fairness, kindness, and respect for private ownership, contributing to both individual and societal well-being. This commandment serves as a reminder to live ethically even in regard to material possessions, respecting others’ rights and avoiding actions that cause harm.

  • “You must not testify falsely against your neighbor.” Ex 20:16

This commandment covers one’s words, honesty and intentions of the heart (Luke 6:45). Promote human flourishing by letting your yes be yes, and your no be no.

  • “You must not covet.” Ex 20:17

The tenth commandment promotes human and societal well-being by encouraging contentment, gratitude towards God for blessings, and honoring our neighbors. It encourages diligence and ethical conduct in business, advising against exploiting others for personal gain.

Conclusion

The spirit of the Ten Commandments extends far beyond mere legalistic observance. It embodies the fundamental principles of love, righteousness, and reverence for God and others. While the law serves as guideposts for righteous living and societal harmony, it is faith in Jesus Christ that ultimately leads to salvation and fulfills God’s purposes. By grasping the spirit behind the law, believers can navigate life with wisdom, discernment, and a genuine desire to honor God and fulfill our calling and purpose as ambassadors, and therefore an integral part in global human flourishing.

Study our free course Genesis and Exodus here.

Watch this complete lesson here.

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Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

Humility God’s Way

Author: Charles Hegwood

“My how the mighty have fallen,” is a phrase that you may have heard growing up. I often heard it when someone in a high position would fall, be dethroned or get taken down. The phrase often means to convey someone justly being humbled. This phrase has a mocking tone rather than a redemptive one. So, what does scripture say about humility?

Well, scripture says that God ‘humbles the proud.’ You will find themes of mighty kings falling because of their pride. He humbles righteously and for a purpose. He humbles His enemies in justice. He humbles His people to set them on the right path, His path. Today we are going to specifically look at Moses’ story. We will see that God teaches Moses humility by removing Him from a high position and authority so that he realizes that he can do nothing without God’s help.

God Humbles the Proud

When we are first introduced to Moses, it is in a time of struggle. Egypt is killing all the Hebrew boys. Moses, by the grace of God, is found floating in a basket by none other than the Pharaoh’s daughter. He then grew up in the household of Pharaoh and was educated and given authority. At some point in the story Moses recognized that God’s people, his people, were being unjustly treated. He made an attempt at rescuing a Hebrew who was being beaten by an Egyptian.

However, all he managed to do was kill the Egyptian. His arrogance was attempting to rescue God’s people his way. It did not work. The next day, two Hebrews were fighting, upon seeing Moses, they asked him snarkily if he would kill them too. This had to sting a bit. He certainly thought that he would have been seen as a hero and savior. However, they only saw Moses like the other Egyptian overseers. So, Moses fled in fear. The mighty had fallen. It was here that God would begin to work.

The Beginning of Humility

Moses found himself sitting in the wilderness alone and afraid. However, God was with him, even though he didn’t know it yet. His position and authority were gone. So was his pride. He had nothing left to be prideful about. However, being made humble is only the first step of the process. True humility comes from understanding that you can do nothing without God. Moses is not there yet.

For example, a scene unfolded in front of him with shepherds who were chasing away women at a well. Moses the protector sprung into action and chased away the shepherds and made sure the women got water. The story closes with Moses getting married to one of the women and living in the tent of the priest of Midian, his father-in-law.

There is some growth in humility here. Moses, who had previously dwelled in the palace now lived in a tent. He had always found his home in Egypt now he found himself living in a land that was not his. We see this feeling of sojourning in his first son’s name. Moses, no longer the man of position and authority, now helped care for a tent- dwelling people in the wilderness and seemed content.

God’s Presence Brings Humility

Moses had lost his power, position, and home. He had failed to rescue his people and now dwelt in a tent. Then God intervened in Moses’ story. God must intervene in our story as well. God showed himself to Moses in the fire of the burning bush. It is in this setting that God said that He would rescue His people that Moses could not rescue.

At first, Moses must have been relieved God was taking the lead on the rescue plan. Then God told Moses that He would use him to do this rescue. Moses argued with God saying that there was no way he could be the right person. Humility is a process and Moses was walking on the path but had yet to reach the destination. As you read through Moses’ exchange with God in chapter 3 you will see that Moses’ humility doubts God’s sovereignty. This is not godly humility. We will get there though.

Even though Moses had not yet arrived, notice what was happening. He was talking with God. I am always amazed at the grace and patience of God speaking to sinful humans. We see this through scripture. As Moses began to learn humility He began to talk with God. He was learning that without God he could do nothing. This is the result of God drawing near to the humbled heart.

The Journey of Humility

As I said before, humility is a journey we take. Moses learned throughout his life and ministry to be humble and trust in God. That does not mean that Moses did not have moments where he acted in his own strength, he did. That does mean we see a pattern of progression towards godly humility.

One of my favorite accounts of this is in Exodus 33:15. After the disastrous idolatry of the golden calf, God called Israel a ‘stiff-necked people’ and that He would not go with them any farther. Moses pleaded with God that if God did not go with them that he would not lead the people. Why? Moses realized that without God, he could not do it. After this intercession is when God’s presence altered Moses’ face. He had humbled himself rightly before God. He was on the path toward growth in godly humility.

Conclusion

Humility is a journey. Moses learned to be humble. Education is a process that takes time and testing. Learning humility was not something Moses mastered in this life. We will never master it perfectly either. We can learn though. We can see that we do not and cannot do anything without the power of God. Once we have come to the end of ourselves, then we may truly begin the journey to godly humility. A humility that looks to God for every breath and action. A humility that says, “I cannot and will not do this without You God.” Moses learned this over a long life of trials. I hope you will too.

Watch this complete lesson here.

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Christian History Digging Deeper into the Word

What is in a Name? A Story of Faith

Author: Charles Hegwood

Names are important. I like to joke that I am a man of many names. Most of course are nicknames. My real name comes from a TV character. Throughout the Bible, though, names had deep meaning. This is especially true in the book of Genesis. Jacob for example, means trickster or heel grabber. And we see that as Jacob was born, he was grabbing his brother’s heel. Following Jacob’s story throughout Genesis, you will see that he is quite the trickster and usurper. Today we want to zoom in on Jacob and his story. We want to see the rambling, twisted, valley-filled path of faith he took. Of course, we also want to look at a name; not a nickname, but a new name. God gave Jacob a new name after meeting with him in Genesis 32. We see that this new name describes Jacob, His descendants, and every one of us as well. Who is Jacob? Who are we? I hope that today you will see the winding, often stumbling path of faith with the knowledge that God strives with you.

The Background

In the context of chapter 32, we find that Jacob is fearful of meeting his brother Esau. Wait, back up. Why would he be fearful? Well, the last time he saw his brother was when he had stolen the blessing from him. Jacob sought the blessing through scheming and tricking his brother and father. Jacob’s trick resulted in him running for his life.

Many years passed and Jacob learned to be humble after finding himself tricked by his uncle. Still, God blessed Jacob, just as he promised to do. Jacob had twelve sons and many possessions, knowing that he did not deserve God’s good favor. God also met with Jacob at Bethel, promising to be with and bless him. The reader must then ask, will Jacob trust in God? Then we arrive at chapter 32 where Jacob found out that Esau wanted to meet. With God’s promise in mind, how would Jacob respond?

The Scheming

The chapter started well, as Jacob recognized that God’s presence was with him. Faith! But by verse 7 we see the old scheming Jacob come out. He was fearful, seemingly forgetting the promise that God had just made to him. Yet, when I look at this story, I get it. I see my reflection in Jacob’s fear. My faith journey and I suspect yours as well, looks like a winding road. After soaring spiritual highs, life hits and it all comes crashing into a deep valley. Can you relate? Jacob could.

He heard his brother had 400 men. That is a lot of people. So, Jacob divided the camp into two camps so if Esau attacked, at least half of his people would survive. It was a good, strategic plan, but it showed a complete lack of faith that God would fulfill his promises. Jacob also sent in front of his camp a parade of goods and gifts to help buy the favor of his brother. What was Jacob doing? He was relying on his schemes and his cleverness to get past a potentially difficult situation.

He did not go to God in prayer first. He went instead to his ability and strength. There is nothing wrong with a good strategy, but do you first go to God or your understanding and strength? Do we beseech the wisdom of God over our own? And now the Scheming Jacob finds himself alone, yet not completely alone.

The Wrestling Match

Jacob suddenly found himself in an impromptu wrestling match with a stranger. The fight went on until morning. At some point in the fight, Jacob recognized that his opponent was an angel of God. Jacob thus held on, begging for a blessing. Finally, the angel reached out and dislocated Jacob’s hip with a mere touch. What is happening here?

This wrestling match acts as a parable for how Jacob interacts with God. Jacob wrestles. He struggles. He clings. However, it was not that the Lord was unable to defeat Jacob. After all, he only had to touch his hip to break it. He could have easily destroyed Jacob, but that was not the point or purpose of the fight.

The point was that as Jacob clung and wrestled with God, God wrestled with Jacob. See the beauty and grace of God here. God wrestled with a man until daybreak. A man He could have easily destroyed. A man who was unworthy of the attention God gave him. A man like you and me. God’s grace prevailed in this fight. This would be the picture of how God would interact with Israel, formally Jacob, for the rest of his life, and with Israel, the descendants of Jacob, for the rest of their lives. God would wrestle with obstinate people. He would wrestle them back to Himself. At times, God would have to inflict a curse, like that of Jacob’s hip to bring them limping back to Him. This is a picture of how God interacts with you and me too. He wrestles with us when we sin. Praise God that He does not give up. Sometimes it can be painful, but our limp, whether spiritual or physical, reminds us that God contends with us.

The Name

God blessed Jacob there and bestowed a new name, Israel. This new name had deep meaning. “One who strives or struggles with God.” This new name was a picture of Jacob’s faith journey, his descendant’s journey, and our journey. They would fight. They would stray from the path of God. Yet, God would wrestle them back. So too it is with us. We are a people who wrestle with God. Cling to Him. Limp back to Him when you veer away. Remember He is with you.

This is why I take comfort in the story of Jacob; a man who did not always live up to the blessing of God. Just read chapter 33. He immediately fell back into his scheming ways. We often do too. And just like Jacob receiving a new name, one day we too will receive a new name from God. On that day, however, all striving and struggling will cease as we see our Savior face to face. Our new name will be a new identity and a beginning of a new life, an eternal life. This promised new name answers the question, “Who are we?” We are God’s people.

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Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

God’s Grace in the Garden

Author: Charles Hegwood

We enter into one of the most sorrowful yet hopeful stories in all of Scripture. This is the Fall in Genesis 3. Questions are likely swirling through your mind as you recall the details of this tragic chapter. Such as, why did God put that tree in the garden in the first place? Why did God allow the serpent in the garden? Who was the serpent? And so, on it goes. What I want to do is look past the ugliness of this chapter and embrace the impossible grace of God in the face of an all-out rebellion by His special creation who we know as Adam and Eve.

If you grew up in church like I did, I encourage you to let go of all you know for one moment and read this chapter with fresh eyes. If you have vaguely read this chapter at some point in the past. That is okay. I welcome you to read it and take in all that is there. As we begin to dig in, I want to highlight the grace of God that is prominently displayed in this chapter. We rebelled and yet God did not abandon us but embraced us and promised a way to redeem us. Let us now look at those acts of grace and shadows of redemption.

The Setup

First, let us look back at all the good that God had given the man and woman. God gave Adam life and spirit. God breathed into him. God planted a garden and placed the man in it. God gave the man a purpose to fill the earth with worshipers who reflect God Himself. Even in the command to not eat of one tree, God was giving the man the offer of a relationship.

If Adam obeyed, then he was reflecting his love to God. All these good, gracious things were mentioned in the previous chapter. Adam had done nothing to create anything or to warrant the favor of God. Chapter 2 drips with God’s love and grace towards Adam, Eve, and by extension us. So let us not lose the wonderful context that precedes the rebellion. The darkness of the Fall is contrasted by the light of God’s goodness.

The Rebellion

The man and woman rebel against God through the eating of the fruit. Back up just a little bit though. We mistakenly assume eating the fruit was the first sin, but that is rash. Before Eve ate the fruit, she thought, “It looks good to me, I don’t know what all the fuss is about. Maybe God is holding back on us. (Paraphrase and added commentary)” The first sin was the thought that maybe she knew what was best for herself; better than God did. That thought sowed the seeds of the act.

Let us back up a little further. Why was the serpent in the garden to begin with? Adam’s responsibility was to take care of the garden as an act of worship to God. If there was a crafty serpent, Adam had the authority from God to remove it. And yet there the serpent was, talking to Eve about the one rule God had given the man. Adam did nothing to stop this. We know by later context, that he was likely right there listening in. He may have even watched Eve pick the fruit. Never did he step in and try to stop it. Adam was not a voice of reason, calling Eve back from the edge of transgression. He did not quell her questioning of God’s goodness. You can see rebellion from every angle.

God’s Grace to the Man and Woman

God could have swooped in after the eating of the fruit and wiped Adam and Eve out. They could have died instantly. God could have come in like an angry father yelling and swinging the belt of justice, but He entered the garden quietly. He asked questions as a father would his disobedient children. This was grace. This was more than they deserved. God calmly spoke to the two people who had just spat in His face with their sins.

God did not mock the covers they had sown to hide their nakedness. The fig leaves did nothing to hide their shame. God one by one, gave them a chance to repent and come clean. Adam blamed God and Eve, and Eve blamed the serpent. Neither of them took responsibility for their actions. God gracefully gave out judgments. This may seem harsh, but consider what God had the right to do. He would have been just to kill them. The judgments were graceful in their promise of life. Eve would experience pain, but would still give new life through childbirth. Adam’s work would be painful and difficult, but they would live a life.

Then something amazing happened. God promised that these judgments would not always be so. Someone was coming that would end the curse they had brought on the earth. The ‘he’ who would strike the serpent would also be wounded. A battle was coming. Throughout the rest of the Old Testament, this image of a coming Redeemer would continue. We know this is fulfilled by Jesus. Even in the ashes of rebellion and judgment, God promised to restore what was broken.

Finally, God did not demand their blood. They did not die, but some animals did. God used animal skins to cover them. This covering was a shadow. The animals died instead of Adam and Eve. The animals’ death covered their nakedness and shame. The shadow here is the promise that someone will die instead of us. We know that is Jesus. He died in our place and His blood covered our sin and rebellion, our shame.

Conclusion

In all these things, the grace of God drips from the pages of the Bible. Far from the angry God, some atheists like to paint in the Old Testament, as this story highlights God’s goodness and grace to sinful people. This grace is only magnified as the story continues into chapter 4.  I invite you to read through the Old Testament and see the grace of God, even in judgment. See the hope in the darkness through the promises found in this chapter. Your eyes will be open to the wonderful truth of God’s love for you.

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Christian History Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

Created for God’s Glory

Author: Charles Hegwood

The route was difficult and the path steep. The stairs are worn and rounded showing their age in every crack and discoloration. The traveler painfully continues his journey. At the top of a mountain sits the old man, full of wisdom and knowledge. The traveler has come far to ask his most important questions, about the meaning of life. At least this is the picture in my mind as I think about asking some of life’s deepest questions. It’s also a common trope in stories. At some point in everybody’s life, a person will ask, “Why am I here?” “What is the meaning of life?”

The good news is that you do not have to journey to find some old guru at the top of a mountain. The Bible you hold in your hand every day answers these questions. In Genesis 2, we get to see the creation of man. Captured within this story God reveals the reason and purpose for our lives. We see that people were created by God to represent Him and glorify Him throughout the world.

The Main Character

            When we approach the Bible, we must ask ourselves who is the main character of the story. Hint, it is not you or me. However, so many people read the Bible and interpret it as if they were the main characters and actors. So let us look at the text itself. We see that God is the main character in Genesis 2; and all of Scripture. Just in chapter 2, we see God as active 22 times. The man God created is only active 4 times.

Why is it important that we take time and observe where God is active in the text? The reason is that we must understand who we are in relation to who God is. God created, made, spoke, formed, planted, placed, and commanded as some examples of how God is active in Genesis 2. God is in the driver’s seat. You will never understand life, your purpose, or who you are if you do not have a proper understanding of who God is. Most of the world’s problems go back to a breakdown in the understanding that this life is about God, not us. Therefore, we conclude that the purpose for our lives is to worship and glorify God. This is our creative purpose. You did not form yourself, but God did. We owe everything that we are to God.

God’s Goodness and Grace 

            When you read Genesis 2, I hope you see that God is good. He breathed life into the man He formed. God formed all the other animals, but He only breathed into the man. Our very life is a gift from God, but our spirit is more so. God planted a garden for the man. Understand that man didn’t have to do anything to grow the garden, God made everything grow and supplied the garden with beautiful trees with delicious fruit. God also watered the garden and thus maintained it. The man did not have to find the garden but was placed there by God. This is a love story. God took care of and out of His goodness and grace supplied the man that He gave life and spirit to all these good things.

I know there is often confusion about why God places a forbidden tree in the garden. He gave a command to eat every tree, except for the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Bear with me here, God’s one rule given to the man was not foolish or arbitrary, but an invitation to join God in a relationship. This was entering into a covenant with God. The man’s obedience was a display of his love for God. Our obedience to God in our lives is our act of love to Him. We obey Him because we love Him. This is how we get to thank God for all the good He has done for us.

Created to represent God

             In verse 18 the story shifts. God now has the man begin to name the animals. Why? This was one of the ways that humans were meant to represent God on earth. We already know from chapter one that God created people in His image to fill and subdue the earth. The man is now fulfilling part of this command as he is given agency to name animals. It is easy to miss, but in verse 19 it says, “And whatever the man called a living creature, that was its name.” This is so amazing. God has given man the responsibility and the authority to name the animals. Thus, the name was so because the man now reflects God’s authority over nature. He has become what we often call a vice-regent of the King.

We also reflect God through communion with other people. Why was it not good for man to be alone? God said it was not good. God determines what is good for us. He did not create us to be solitary creatures, but to be social. And as the story goes, God formed a woman as a helper for the man. Let me give some quick points here. The woman was not a separate creation but shares the same breath of God the man has. The woman therefore has the same vice-regent status and authority to represent God on earth. The man and the woman will also represent God’s creative purpose through the propagation of children.

Conclusion

 As we reflect on Genesis 2, we see that we were created to represent and glorify God. We do this by understanding God as King over our lives. Therefore, we see our lives in relation to God. We reflect on God’s goodness and grace displayed through our creation. Finally, we see that we were created to represent God through working and subduing nature. As you ponder the deep questions surrounding meaning and purpose, consider who God is, what He has done and is doing, and what He has commanded us to do. Our purpose is to glorify and represent God in our world. This is not a small task but a glorious one. Go and glorify and represent God to the people in your lives today.

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All Christian History Digging Deeper into the Word

Genesis 1: Genesis and Creation

Author: Jon Slenker

Genesis Chapter One

Genesis chapter one. Those words are profound in themselves. So much is wrapped up in those three words. Opportunity, beginnings, hope, life, love, the galaxies, volcanoes, pigs and plants, seascapes and mountain vistas, smells, colors, texture. Creation is truly marvelous! Evil will come and distort God’s good creation, but for now, we sit back in awe and wonder at God speaking earth into existence and his plan for it.

Creation and the Nature of God

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”
Genesis 1:1

God exists outside of time and space. He is Spirit who creates as part of his nature (John 4:24). The creation account tells us much about God’s nature. God values order, prescribes value, and mandates his creation fulfill their identity and purpose. He is creative and orderly. He is intentional and desires to relate to and care for his creation. God spoke and it came to be. Out of nothing, God created.

The doctrine of the Trinity finds solid evidence for a Triune God in the creation account. In verse 26 God says, “let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness…”

Order, Harmony and Intentionality

The author of Genesis records the events of God’s creation as one of order, harmony and intentionality. Most creative people lack the ability to be orderly. In fact, sometimes following the rules impedes the creative process. God, however, is perfectly creative and orderly. We can see beyond having an orderly, harmonious and intentional plan that he values action. But to what end? What is his plan of action? That all creation would fulfill its purpose and therefore propagate a more vibrant and full life. His mandate is that we would worship and obey through being fruitful and multiplying. Healthy things are fruitful and fruitful things multiply.

As God brought order from disorder and did it in a timely fashion, he also built it into nature that plants, sea and land creatures and man would reproduce, each of their own kind (Gen. 1:11-12, 21-22, 24-25, 28). Each thing in creation  is unique and in a constant state of changing.  A law in Physics states there is a set number of molecules in existence. None can be added or destroyed, they merely change states. One concept within Thermodynamics is entropy, which states that left to its own creation will naturally fall into decay and disorder, the effect of sin marring God’s good creation.

Day 1 – God created light (1:3-5)
Day 2 – God separated the water and created the heavens (skies) (1:6-8)
Day 3 – God separated the waters from land (1:9-10) and created vegetation (1:11-13)
Day 4 – God created the stars and the moon and sun (1:14-19)
Day 5 – God created living creatures in the sea (1:20-23)
Day 6 – God created living creatures on land and man (1:24-31)

There is harmony in creation, an interdependent relationship among all created things and beings. Each aspect of creation is dependent on the other in some way. How glorious is our God that we would all excel in certain abilities and require the assistance from others in areas we don’t. God built community into nature and His intentions are that creation would exist in perfect harmony with itself and Himself.

Identity, Value and Purpose

God is relentless for his creation. He proves it by giving identity, value and purpose. There was a purpose behind creation. God did not want to create and then leave it to itself, it was too valuable to him. He wants to be intimately involved with his handiwork as the author, shepherd, high priest, king, judge and redeemer. He is ever present in the creation event with his Spirit hovering over the face of the waters, and reviewing his work and calling it good (Gen. 1:2). God is ascribing worth and value to his creation by calling it “good” or “very good” six times (1:10, 12, 18, 21, 25; 1:31). This tells us that God cares for his creation and that it brings him joy.

God displays order and harmony within identity through the unique individuality of each thing according to its kind. Everything plays its part and has a role in God’s creation order. The heavens, land, sea, vegetation, birds, animals, fish and humans all play a vital role in different life cycles that regenerates and reproduces life and the atmosphere for it.  Life is important to God. You are important to God and have an incredible purpose.

Imago Dei

One theologian writes that “Genesis 1 and 2 provides the backdrop for God’s relationship with humanity and with the rest of creation.”[1] Five times God calls his creation “good”, but on the sixth, he said “behold, it was very good” (1:31). ““Good” does not exist abstractly apart from God. Rather, God’s pronouncement that His work was “good” conveys that creation was rightly related to Himself and thus His work was “good” conveys that creation was rightly related to Himself and thus existing as a display of His glory.”[2] Man was made in the image of God, or “imago dei” in the Greek, as his special creation whom he wanted to be after his own image and heart. This emphasizes that we are more like God than like other creatures.[3] We were made to reflect God’s image on earth as his vice regents, children, stewards and ambassadors. We are to be like him. To conduct ourselves in a manner worthy of our calling and nature (Phil. 1:27).

The Creation Mandate

“God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” Then God said, “I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food. And to all the beasts of the earth and all the birds in the sky and all the creatures that move along the ground—everything that has the breath of life in it—I give every green plant for food.” And it was so.”
Genesis 1:28-30

The creation mandate is the foundation of the great commission. Jesus echoes his creation mandate in Matthew 28:18-20 to his disciples and thus to the Church and to you and I. We see the creation mandate restated multiple times throughout history in the scriptures. First to Adam and Eve, then to the animals, Noah, Abraham, Jacob that we should be fruitful and multiply.  One Teacher writes that “few understand that the mission “to make disciples of all nations” is actually grounded in God’s original “Creation Order.”” This first command carries with it the implication to “worship and obey.” The Teacher adds, “the means by which dominion would be exercised would be through the intentional multiplication and dispersion of image-bearers throughout the earth.” God’s first commandment to Adam and Eve carries the same thrust and importance as Christ’s commission to us. He promises that he will be with us even to the end of the age (Mt. 28:20). This is an incredible promise and blessing![4]

God has entrusted his creation to man and woman. We are to be his stewards, ruling over ourselves and his creation as he would. We are therefore covenanted image bearers of God. What a blessing! As his image bearers we are to be fruitful, multiply and fill the earth with other image bearers. Healthy things grow and growing things multiply. How are you stewarding, or managing what God has entrusted to you? Are you caring gently for God’s creation? Different cultures value and honor and mistreat different things,  creatures or people. To the best of your ability, small or large, are you treating God’s people and his/our creation as He would?

Conclusion

How are you fulfilling the creation mandate by worshiping and obeying as God’s vice regent and ambassador? What does caring for his creation and making disciples look like for you right now? What is your favorite way that you ‘image’ God? What areas of life are you orderly or messy? When are you most creative? What drains your creativity? How are you intentional or accidental? What does it look like? Like a mirror we are to reflect God’s image to the earth, creative, intentional, What a privilege to be welcomed into God’s work and entrusted with his creation.


[1] Robinson, George, article, published in www.GlobalMissiology.org October 2015  “Grounding Disciple-Making in God’s Creation Order: Filling the Earth with the Image of God”
[2] Robinson, George, article, October 2015
[3]  Robinson, George, article, October 2015
[4] Robinson, George, article, October 2015

Categories
All Digging Deeper into the Word Studying the Bible

How to Study the Bible

Author: Jon Slenker

God chose to speak to mankind through the bible. This is why it is referred to as his “word”. It has been said that when you open the word of God, you open the mouth of God. It is important to know how to study the bible not just to know the book, but to know the Author. Learning how to study the bible is an incredible journey filled with excitement, beauty, wisdom, deep love and strong justice. Sometimes it makes perfect sense at the perfect moment, other times you set it down and have more questions about your circumstance than when you started.

“This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.”
Joshua 1:8

God’s people are commanded to study his word (Josh. 1:8). The benefits of studying the bible are profound and eternal. When you study, take it slow, be patient, prayerful and cautious not to jump to conclusions. Learning how to study the bible for yourself gives you freedom to know and relate to God in more personal and practical ways. It also helps to know when someone is mishandling the text’s meaning and purpose. The bible warns us and encourages us to entrust it to those that will remain faithful hearers, students, and doers of it. The challenge remains that many interpret the bible wrongly either intentionally or accidentally. Interpreting God’s Word is an art and science to be practiced with care.

3 Phases of Bible Study

1 Observation

The first phase of bible study is Observation. As you open God’s word, approach it with reverence, humility and a healthy curiosity. Sometimes we study for different purposes. We may study a topic or doctrine, a word, verse, or entire book or letter. A healthy practice for studying the bible is one book at a time. Read the book in its entirety like you would watch a movie. Then start back at the beginning and practice observation, interpretation and application for each chapter. Observation, interpretation and application may be used for a passage containing a few verses or one. Remember the broader context. Don’t miss the forest for the trees. A student of the bible is like a detective attempting to see the big picture by correctly piecing together important data.

Taking your time studying an entire book or letter over weeks or months is helpful  to understand the bible in its entirety. The student should not approach a text simply to gain knowledge, but allow it to affect their heart, mind, soul and to put it into practice. Becoming a good observer is an acquired skill. It is our first line of defense for not misreading the text or making it about ourselves. Observation rightly aligns us and places us in the audience, not on stage.

Questions for Observation

  • Who: Author, audience, characters?
  • What: Events, occasions, theme, topic?
  • When: What was life like, global events that occurred during that time period?
  • Where: Place and culture, weather, distance, geography, topography, market, temple, home?

As you build evidence, record things that stand out to you and are emphasized, repeated, related, alike, unlike, or true to life. During observation, fight the feeling to make meaning of the clues. Note the questions you have, but avoid chasing them at this time. Keep inspecting!

2 Interpretation

The second phase is Interpretation. Now that you have collected your data, it’s time to make sense of it. This can be difficult at times due to language, cultural or communication barriers. Interpretation is important. Across the world, the Church gathers in different denominations solely for the purpose of how we interpret the bible. It is important for you to study the bible to know God and his ways to develop your own convictions and beliefs without needing to solely rely on someone else’s. Knowing how to study the bible as a faithful observer and interpreter reveals to us the pillars and principles that God established. He wants us to be knowledgeable, wise and aware to live an abundant, quiet and peaceful life (John 10:10; 1 Thess. 4:11).

“All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.”
2 Timothy 3:16-17

Characteristics of the Bible

Like God, his word is unchanging and eternal (Psalms 119:89). It does not contradict itself or contain errors. It is inspired, meaning it was “breathed out” by God (Psalms 119:105). The bible affirms itself as the holy, inspired word of God (1 Cor. 2:12-13). The bible tells a unified story centered around the primary character, Christ (Rom. 1:1-4). Jesus himself modeled how to interpret the things concerning Christ in all the scriptures beginning with “Moses and all the Prophets” (Luke 24:27). Peter would follow his lead preaching at Pentecost (Acts 2:14-36). Stephen, mimicked this in Acts 7 when he was martyred for preaching from a christ-centered interpretation of the bible. Paul teaches that the righteousness of God comes through faith and not works, explaining that “the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it– the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe.” (Rom. 3:21-22). These passages show us that the Old Testament is the foundation of the New Testament and the New Testament assumes and affirms the Old Testament.

Begin your interpretation by establishing the context. Using the information from your observation, determine the author’s intent for writing this book or letter. Ask the following questions to build the original context, meaning and purpose. Answer the questions that relate.

Questions for Interpretation

  • What is the main point or big idea of the book or letter?
  • What is the structure of the book or letter? Are there sections of the book that transcend the chapters? The 5 ‘books’ or sections of Psalms is a good example of this. Chapters 1-41, 42-72, 73-89, 90-106 and 107-150 each have a unique tone or theme.
  • How does this text or passage fit into the book as a whole?
  • Does the author talk about this topic elsewhere?
  • What is the occasion?
  • What events are taking place and why is the author including them?
  • Determine a timeline of events as is helpful
  • What is the genre of writing? (Is it historical narrative, poetry, prophecy, an eye witness or secondary account?)
  • What does it say about God’s or man’s nature?
  • How does God relate to, or treat man and vice-versa?
  • How does man relate to, or treat man?
  • Is there a truth being told?
  • Is there a promise to believe?
  • Is there a sin to avoid?
  • Is there a command to obey?
  • Is there a principle to follow?
  • Is there an example to follow?
  • Has the pace of an account sped up or slowed down to emphasize something important?
  • What is being left out?
  • What is clear or unclear?

As you work to put the pieces together, fight the urge to apply it to yourself or others. Determine what the main point of the text is. What does the author want the recipient to know, believe or do? Is there a theme, topic, or belief the author explicitly or implicitly highlights? Christ-centered interpretation does not mean you should turn over every rock and pebble attempting to find some relation to Christ, but it does seek to know how Christ fulfills, relates to or affirms the main point of the text either in his birth, life, ministry, leadership, sacrifice, resurrection, or teachings. Finally, Utilize other sources like dictionaries, concordances, atlases, or commentaries. Let scripture interpret scripture before consulting outside sources.

3 Application

The final phase of studying the bible is Application. This is where we apply the truths and teachings of the passage studied to our own lives. Remember, the interpretation is one but the application is many. Paul tells Timothy to know himself, therefore, we should continue to inspect and know ourselves (1 Tim. 4:16). Our beliefs, traits, tendencies, emotions, weaknesses, inabilities, how we respond or react under mild or extreme stress (Rom. 12:3). We have to know God to follow him and know ourselves to lead ourselves. The two are not mutually exclusive.

Questions for Application

  • In what ways did the original audience apply the truths passed down to them?
  • How might they have applied it in their context?
  • How are we like or unlike them?
  • How should we be like or unlike them?
  • Is there a tendency or trait that the Spirit is bringing to mind?
  • O.S. Acrostic
    • What is God SAYING to me?
    • How should I OBEY?
    • Who should I SHARE this truth with?
  • How should my character, conduct, or conversation be affected by the Word of God?
  • How should this truth affect my:
    • Attitudes – toward God, others, circumstances, myself
    • Knowledge of God
    • Behavior – habits, reactions, positive or negative
    • Relationships – Where do I need to forgive, seek forgiveness, encourage, rebuke, submit, lead?

Application requires a decision and a specific plan of action in order to allow the Holy Spirit to make scriptural principles part of us. It takes around three months for habits to be replaced. Our tendencies are hardwired in us, and God desires behavior that honors ourselves, our people and him. But studying the bible is not just behavior modification or comprehension, it’s about salvation, truth, transformation, and relationship with God and man. Studying the bible should ultimately prepare you for a life of worshiping God and seeking the highest good of others.

Application is “best served” with prayer and meditation. What is God saying to you? Ask him. What does he want you to know, cling to, be warned of or comforted by? Let his word be ointment for healing, iron for sharpening, sweeter than honey, green pastures filled with peace, a rod for discipline and a staff for direction.

Categories
All Can You Trust the Bible? Digging Deeper into the Word Studying the Bible

The Purpose of the Bible

Author: Jon Slenker

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.”
2 Timothy 3:16-17

That God would reveal himself to mankind is no mystery! The very act is representative of who he is. His nature, character, personality, virtues and values, mission and vision, is all made known to mankind through the bible. God is a relational God who desires to know and be known. The express purpose of the bible is that we may know God, what he has done for us and how we should live in light of his revelation.

Three Kinds of Revelation

  1. General Revelation: Things that were made by God, like the galaxies, sun, sky, trees, and living things, are all ways that God has revealed himself and his handiwork. No one is without this evidence or knowledge of God. Refer to Psalm 19:1-6, Romans 1:18-25 for further study.
  2. Special Revelation: God interacting in special ways with his creation, include speaking audibly to man, revealing himself and his power through the Flood, a burning bush, a pillar of cloud and fire, the parting of the Red Sea, handwriting on stone tablets and palace walls, his written word the Bible, Jesus, his Spirit, miracles, dreams, and visions. Refer to Exodus 32:16, Psalm 19:7-13, Hebrews 1:1-3, Luke 1, John 1:1-14, Acts 2:1-4, Romans 1:16-17, 10:9-10.
  3. Progressive Revelation: The teaching that God has continually revealed more and more of his character, will and mission over time. Refer to Psalm 78:1-4, John 16:12-14 and Galatians 1:11-12. 

“For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.”
1 Corinthians 3:12

How to Know God

“I am God, and there is no other; I am God, and there is none like me. I make known the end from the beginning, from ancient times, what is still to come. I say, ‘My purpose will stand, and I will do all that I please.’”
Isaiah 46:9b–10

There is only one God (Deut 32:39; Isa 45:5-7; 46:9) and “the most fundamental need of humanity is to know God, and to know Him with ever-increasing clarity and intensity.[1]’” More than anything, the bible reveals God’s character, purposes and principles. It has been said “when you open the word of God, you are opening the mouth of God.” God uses the bible to speak to you and me so that we may know him, trust him and live out our identity and calling as faithful worshipers.

“For the LORD is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations.”
Ps. 100:5

Identity, Character and Attributes of God

The bible reveals God’s character by how he relates with and rules sovereignly over his creation. In the bible, God self-identifies as and is called: Creator, the I AM, Abba Father, the Ancient of Days, the Living God, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Lord of Hosts, Alpha and Omega, the God of Knowledge, God Most High, Mighty God, the Anointed One, the Word, the Lord Who Provides, the Lord Who Saves, Our Dwelling Place and more!

As we read the Scriptures observing how God interacts with his creation, we find that God’s character is upright and just. He does not lie, he does not change, does not do evil, is relentless for his people, is all powerful, all knowing, full of grace, truth, mercy and love. He is the light of men, holy, hallowed, a helper, and unique. He is the one true God.

“Before the mountains were born or you brought forth the whole world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God.”
Psalm 90:2

To Know God’s Will and Mission

One of God’s purposes in giving us his Holy Scriptures is to follow his will, not simply discover it. We read in 1 Timothy 2:2-3 to pray for all people, kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. Paul continues, “This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.”

God has already revealed his will to us through the bible. If there is any discovering for us to do surrounding his will, it is to know God’s character, attributes and personality with greater wisdom and affection than before. God’s will is clear, to be a righteous ruler, on mission to seek and save that which is lost and marred by evil, sin and death. Since creation, God’s will has been to establish a people for himself and to reign as a benevolent and just Father, Counselor, and King. We do not need to seek out God’s will for our lives, it is not hidden from us or kept in secret to be found out later to see. God’s will was established from the beginning and he has already revealed it to us in his word!

If you want to know the will of God, devote yourself to his word and discern the times. Author, J. Grant Howard, Jr. writes that “God doesn’t want confused, bewildered, frustrated Christians wandering around anxiously searching for His will. He wants people who are walking confidently and peacefully in His will.”

Our God, the God of the universe, is a missionary God. Since Genesis 3 and the Fall he has relentlessly pursued to the point of sacrifice for the salvation of his children from every tribe, tongue and nation (Rev. 7:9-10). Jesus entered humanity, put on flesh, forgave sin, granted new life, gave confidence to the broken-hearted and destitute, humbled the proud and corrected poor theology and practice. He laid the foundation for the establishment, the Church, and sits as the chief cornerstone (Eph. 2:19-21). He began and ended his three year ministry with a focus on character as we live out, preach and disciple others on the good news that Christ has come and revealed himself and his salvation to mankind!

To Know Ourselves and Our Purpose

“Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God–”
John 1:12

Identity and Calling

Another overarching purpose of the bible is to know our own identity and calling in relation to God. We were made to worship and obey. We were created for a spectacular purpose. Therefore, we must know who God is in order to truly know ourselves. We find our meaning, hope and peace in our identity in Christ. The bible is God’s way of telling us who we are and how to live out our days as “Children of God” (1 John 3:1), “ambassadors” of his Kingdom (2 Cor. 5:20), a “holy priesthood” (1 Peter 2:9), and “pilgrims”, in a world that is not our home (Hebrews 13:14-16).

The bible reveals our purpose, tells us how to live, grounds us in our physical and spiritual lineage and heritage, and gives us historical context for our lives and the times we now live. It teaches us about the past, present and future.

Every believer can be sure of their identity as adopted children of God, called to worship, obey, love others and make disciples. God gave us his word, so that we might know how to act  and behave in ways that honor him and others as we join him on his mission (Matthew 5; John 13:35). The author of Hebrews tells us an incredible purpose of the bible in chapter 4, verse 12 stating, “For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.” It seems at times when we read the bible, it is moreover reading us.

The Great Commission passages in Matthew 28:16-20, Mark 16:14–18, Luke 24:44–49, John 20:19-23, and Acts 1:4–8 lay out our calling and responsibility as God’s ambassadors and Church. We are to preach the gospel, baptize, teach to obey, gather in community for the breaking of bread, worship, pray, make disciples and give of our time, talent, treasure and table as others have need (Acts 2:32-36).

“Follow God’s example, therefore, as dearly loved children and walk in the way of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.”
Ephesians 5:1-2


[1] Merida,  Faithful Preaching, 2009

Categories
Digging Deeper into the Word Featured Spiritual Development

The Manifesto of the Messiah

Author: Rachel Kidd

Just like Matthew tells us, Luke emphasizes that Jesus was a man on a mission. Jesus came to bring a message of good news to spiritually poor people, the blind, bound, broken-hearted and bruised people. He says that His message will make the blind see, set the bound free, and heal the broken.  

Luke is purposeful in the way in which he presents the message of Christ, making a clear argument for the gospel. Jesus proclaims this message in Luke chapter 4, proves it in chapter 5, and practices it throughout the rest of the book of Luke.  

Jesus continually extends an invitation to us to become a part of His manifesto, a participant in His mission. In a broken world, we are always interacting with the spiritually blind and bound.  

Today, the same Christ that walked the earth is within us. As the body of Christ, the church has the responsibility to fulfill Jesus’ mission on earth. 

We are called to walk with the broken and sick, to share with them the Good News of the Gospel, or to fulfill Jesus’ manifesto.  

Building Bonds 

Throughout Luke, we see Jesus reaching out to the spiritually broken over and over again. We witness the bonds He builds with fishermen, sinners, and tax collectors. 

Simon Peter was an ordinary fisherman from Nazareth, a working class man a bit rough around the edges. But Jesus called him. He gave him a nick-name Petra or Rocky, meaning stability. Peter was nothing but stable, but Jesus called out this quality in him.  

Jesus developed His relationship with Peter, calling him the ‘rock’ and encouraging him for three years. By the book of Acts, Peter became the rock, a cornerstone of the early church.  

Jesus exemplified what it means to encourage our friends, calling out good qualities in them and helping them become the best versions of themselves.  

When I feel encouraged, I am motivated to improve. Words of affirmation from friends, family, or especially from a person of authority, make me feel valued.  

Whatever you call people, they have a tendency of living up to it. It’s what it means to be a good friend, a good leader, and the living embodiment of the body of Christ.  

The Miracle of Fish 

Early one morning, Jesus is preaching to a crowd of people on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. Despite the crowds, Jesus’ attention is on a fisherman.  

This man is discouraged, he spent all night fishing and didn’t catch a single fish. Jesus knows that one day, this man will be a great church leader and preach to thousands, inciting revival on the day of Pentecost.  

But on this day, this man can’t even catch fish. How can someone who can’t catch fish become a fisher of men? Jesus saw Peter and who he could become.  

With the crowds growing around Him, Jesus has been pushed to the water’s edge and running out of room on dry land. He asks Peter to borrow his boat to use as a pulpit, giving Him more space to preach to the crowds from the water.  

Peter, probably reluctantly, agrees to share his boat. Peter continues to wash his fishing nets while Jesus finishes teaching from the boat. Afterwards, Jesus asks Peter to go out fishing with Him once more.  

Now Peter had been fishing all night and was already discouraged, having caught nothing. But, he goes with Jesus anyway. Reluctantly casting his nets once again, he says “Teacher, we’ve fished all night and caught nothing.”  

Jesus tells Peter to pull the nets in and check again. This time, the nets were overflowing with fish, requiring all hands on deck to pull them in. Both Peter’s and his brother’s boat were full of freshly caught fish, nearly sinking them both.  

Peter falls to Jesus’ feet and says “depart from me oh Lord, I’m a sinful man.” Why would Peter respond this way to the miracle Jesus just performed?  

Jesus is trying to recruit Peter to join Him on his mission, His manifesto. He is calling Peter to be a partner as they give sight to the blind, healing to the broken, and freedom to the spiritually bound.  

He is asking Peter to leave behind his simple fisherman’s life and pursue instead a life dedicated to fishing for men. Peter seems to feel unqualified for this role by Jesus’ side, an uneducated, impulsive sinner with a temper and a foul mouth.  

But, Jesus sees something more in Peter. He knows that this man who can’t even catch fish today, can become a great partner in the mission of the Gospel. He also knows that to get there, He must teach Peter a few things.  

Fishing Lessons 

Jesus teaches Peter and future readers of scripture, a few things about fishing for men as partners in His manifesto.  

  1. You are not the fisherman, Jesus is. You are not the deliverer, Jesus is.  

Without Him in the boat with us, we will return with empty nets.  

Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.” –Matthew 19:26 

When you try to go fishing for men, or lead someone to Christ, it is an impossible task without the power of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the evangelist and Jesus is the fisherman.

You cannot catch men alone, but with Jesus, anything is possible. 

  1. Jesus has control over the boat.  

When Jesus gets on Peter’s fishing boat, Peter is no longer in charge. Jesus tells Peter when to cast the nets, when to pull them up, and when to return to shore.  

When we accept the Holy Spirit in our lives, we are surrendering control to Jesus. We are giving Him authority over our lives, trusting in His wisdom.  

  1. Forsake everything to follow Jesus.  

Peter was a career fisherman. He had spent his life learning his trade and earning a living. But, when Jesus calls him to leave it to follow Him, he does.  

Peter doesn’t bring his hard-earned boat with him, he doesn’t continue to hold on to his former life. He leaves it all behind to become a follower of Jesus, a full-time fisher of men.  

“If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it. What good will it be for a man if he gains the whole world yet loses his soul? Or what can a man give in exchange for his soul?”-Matthew 16:24-26 

Like Peter, we are called to be partner’s in the fulfillment of Jesus’ manifesto. We are called to follow Him, pursue His word, and lead others to Him through the power of the Holy Spirit.  

Categories
Digging Deeper into the Word Spiritual Development

Peace Framework : Part II

Author: Rachel Kidd

In the first blog in this series, we talked about peace and what it really is. We also introduced the Peace Framework, a triangular model of the modes of peace.  

The first side of the triangle, place, is something we might not think of initially when we think of peace. But, it is a crucial piece that can really impact your overall feeling, whether peaceful or chaotic.  

What is Place? 

I don’t know if this is a universal experience, but in my family, nothing motivates us to clean the house from top to bottom like having company. Any time we host a party or get together, everyone pitches in, a frenzy of cleaning products and stashing clutter away. We always pull it together for a sparkling home, complete with scented candle, by the time people arrive.   

Why are we so motivated to make our place, our home, sparkle just for company? Why don’t we feel that drive to clean, to prepare, for ourselves? 

It comes down to asking yourself, how am I motivated?  

Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivation  

Intrinsic motivation is doing something for its inherent value and what it means to you, without outside influence. Extrinsic motivation is doing something for the outcome, whether that be a reward or to avoid punishment.  

Understanding what is compelling you or motivating you is a great way to get to know your needs better and how to better motivate yourself.  

How hopeful are you that your place will be peaceful for you?  

Place encompasses your environment and how it makes you feel. This could be your home, your city, your job/office, even your digital spaces like a desktop or phone. I like to include mental state here as well. 

When my mind is cluttered, my physical space often reflects that. I feel chaotic inside and so I let things like dishes and clutter pile up. It’s a vicious cycle, because the messier my apartment gets, the more overwhelmed I feel. It takes quite a bit of effort, and medication for me, to tackle the mess that has accumulated.  

But, once I do clean and declutter, I feel so relieved. I feel accomplished and proud of my clean space. I then find it much easier to focus on my work for the day, especially working from home.  

In fact, I’ve begun to find the act of cleaning to be meditative, a menial task with short-term payoff that doesn’t require much mental energy. Like a runner feels when they hit their stride, the rest of the mental clutter fades away and they can only feel the soles of their feet hitting the pavement.  

That’s how I feel when I get deep into cleaning mode, focused on my hands and my  

How hopeful are you that your place will be peaceful for you?  

Mary & Martha 

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!” 

 “Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.” –Luke 10:38-42 

The story of Mary and Martha is one of my personal favorites. Like me and my family, Martha is worried and focused on preparing the house for their guests.  

This may be her personality, perhaps she wants her home to be welcoming to Jesus (I can imagine we all would!) and His disciples. This could also be reflective of the gendered expectations placed on women of the day, who would have never been permitted to learn from the Torah with men.  

Martha becomes exasperated at doing all the housework alone, while her sister Mary sits with the men at Jesus’ feet. Perhaps Martha was worried for her sister, fearful of what might happen because of Mary’s flagrant disregard for the societal rules placed upon her.  

That’s why I love Jesus’ response here to Martha’s concern. In direct opposition to what is expected of Him, Jesus tells her that Mary has made the right choice in sitting and choosing to listen.  

Mary sought peace at the feet of Jesus, while Martha sought peace in preparing the home for their guests. I wonder if Martha might have felt more comfortable seeking the teachings of Jesus had the cultural norms of the time been more lenient? Or perhaps she might have joined Mary once everything was prepared, feeling at peace with a clean home and dinner on the table.  

Finding your Place 

Like me, like Mary and Martha, we all seek comfort and peace in place. Determining who you are and what you need out of your place is key as you seek peace within the peace framework.  

Maybe you’re a Martha, you have a hard time hearing from God when your home is cluttered or you prefer quiet time while you clean.  

Or maybe you’re a Mary, who seeks peace first at the feet of Jesus, regardless of the societal expectations placed upon you, because you need that peace first.