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Christian History Church Development

Fulfillment of Jesus’ manifesto

Author: Rachel Kidd

Just like Matthew tells us, Luke emphasizes that Jesus was a man on a mission. Jesus came to bring a message of good news to spiritually poor people, the blind, bound, broken-hearted and bruised people. He says that His message will make the blind see, set the bound free, and heal the broken.

Luke is purposeful in the way in which he presents the message of Christ, making a clear argument for the gospel. Jesus proclaims this message in Luke chapter 4, proves it in chapter 5, and practices it throughout the rest of the book of Luke.

Jesus continually extends an invitation to us to become a part of His manifesto, a participant in His mission. In a broken world, we are always interacting with the spiritually blind and bound.

Today, the same Christ that walked the earth is within us. As the body of Christ, the church has the responsibility to fulfill Jesus’ mission on earth.

We are called to walk with the broken and sick, to share with them the Good News of the Gospel, or to fulfill Jesus’ manifesto.

Building Bonds

Throughout Luke, we see Jesus reaching out to the spiritually broken over and over again. We witness the bonds He builds with fishermen, sinners, and tax collectors.

Simon Peter was an ordinary fisherman from Nazareth, a working class man a bit rough around the edges. But Jesus called him. He gave him a nick-name Petra or Rocky, meaning stability. Peter was nothing but stable, but Jesus called out this quality in him.

Jesus developed His relationship with Peter, calling him the ‘rock’ and encouraging him for three years. By the book of Acts, Peter became the rock, a cornerstone of the early church.

Jesus exemplified what it means to encourage our friends, calling out good qualities in them and helping them become the best versions of themselves.

When I feel encouraged, I am motivated to improve. Words of affirmation from friends, family, or especially from a person of authority, make me feel valued.

Whatever you call people, they have a tendency of living up to it. It’s what it means to be a good friend, a good leader, and the living embodiment of the body of Christ.

The Miracle of Fish

Early one morning, Jesus is preaching to a crowd of people on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. Despite the crowds, Jesus’ attention is on a fisherman.

This man is discouraged, he spent all night fishing and didn’t catch a single fish. Jesus knows that one day, this man will be a great church leader and preach to thousands, inciting revival on the day of Pentecost.

But on this day, this man can’t even catch fish. How can someone who can’t catch fish become a fisher of men? Jesus saw Peter and who he could become.

With the crowds growing around Him, Jesus has been pushed to the water’s edge and running out of room on dry land. He asks Peter to borrow his boat to use as a pulpit, giving Him more space to preach to the crowds from the water.

Peter, probably reluctantly, agrees to share his boat. Peter continues to wash his fishing nets while Jesus finishes teaching from the boat. Afterwards, Jesus asks Peter to go out fishing with Him once more.

Now Peter had been fishing all night and was already discouraged, having caught nothing. But, he goes with Jesus anyway. Reluctantly casting his nets once again, he says “Teacher, we’ve fished all night and caught nothing.”

Jesus tells Peter to pull the nets in and check again. This time, the nets were overflowing with fish, requiring all hands on deck to pull them in. Both Peter’s and his brother’s boat were full of freshly caught fish, nearly sinking them both.

Peter falls to Jesus’ feet and says “depart from me oh Lord, I’m a sinful man.” Why would Peter respond this way to the miracle Jesus just performed?

Jesus is trying to recruit Peter to join Him on his mission, His manifesto. He is calling Peter to be a partner as they give sight to the blind, healing to the broken, and freedom to the spiritually bound.

He is asking Peter to leave behind his simple fisherman’s life and pursue instead a life dedicated to fishing for men. Peter seems to feel unqualified for this role by Jesus’ side, an uneducated, impulsive sinner with a temper and a foul mouth.

But, Jesus sees something more in Peter. He knows that this man who can’t even catch fish today, can become a great partner in the mission of the Gospel. He also knows that to get there, He must teach Peter a few things.

Fishing Lessons

Jesus teaches Peter and future readers of scripture, a few things about fishing for men as partners in His manifesto.

1. You are not the fisherman, Jesus is. You are not the deliverer, Jesus is.

Without Him in the boat with us, we will return with empty nets.

Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.” –Matthew 19:26

When you try to go fishing for men, or lead someone to Christ, it is an impossible task without the power of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the evangelist and Jesus is the fisherman.

You cannot catch men alone, but with Jesus, anything is possible.

2. Jesus has control over the boat.

When Jesus gets on Peter’s fishing boat, Peter is no longer in charge. Jesus tells Peter when to cast the nets, when to pull them up, and when to return to shore.

When we accept the Holy Spirit in our lives, we are surrendering control to Jesus. We are giving Him authority over our lives, trusting in His wisdom.

3. Forsake everything to follow Jesus.

Peter was a career fisherman. He had spent his life learning his trade and earning a living. But, when Jesus calls him to leave it to follow Him, he does.

Peter doesn’t bring his hard-earned boat with him, he doesn’t continue to hold on to his former life. He leaves it all behind to become a follower of Jesus, a full-time fisher of men.

“If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it. What good will it be for a man if he gains the whole world yet loses his soul? Or what can a man give in exchange for his soul?”-Matthew 16:24-26

Like Peter, we are called to be partner’s in the fulfillment of Jesus’ manifesto. We are called to follow Him, pursue His word, and lead others to Him through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Categories
Can You Trust the Bible? Spiritual Development Studying the Bible

The Certainty of Truth

Author: Charles Hegwood

One of the questions we should always ask of any book of the Bible we are reading is, “Why was this book written?” Part of understanding the meaning is understanding the purpose. Often the writer will tell you the ‘why’. Others will require more thought and some light research to uncover. So what about Luke? We see that Luke begins his gospel with an explanation of why he is writing this. He wanted his audience to know his purpose and intent in writing this gospel. We need to consider the purposes and intentions of Luke as we read and interpret his gospel. If we do not then we risk missing the meaning entirely. So why did Luke write? Luke wrote to a specific person or people to tell them that they can have confidence in the truth of Christ that they were taught. So let us look at each part of the first four verses and answer the questions.

The Recipient

The recipient is the original audience the author is writing. This may sound obvious but we must identify the original audience as we consider how to interpret and understand the message that Luke is trying to convey. We discover that the recipient is Theophilus. We do not know who this is. His name means ‘lover of God’ which could be a person’s name or a pseudonym. Some scholars even suggest this could be a pseudonym for a local church as well, so not one person but many. And while we are not sure of exactly who Theophilus was, we do know enough to understand Luke’s message and purpose.
Theophilus was a person or people that Luke knew and had respect for. We know that Theophilus was a believer as well. Luke is not sharing the gospel for the first time with him either, but instead writing to give Theophilus more confidence in what he already believed. This information helps us as we read and understand Luke. It is written to believers like us. We have believed and therefore Luke’s purpose is to give us more confidence in what we already believe.

The Process and Message

How does Luke compile his information? Or another question we can ask is, “How can we trust Luke’s information?” For the first question, we see that Luke took it upon himself to compile information from interviews with eyewitnesses. He sought to investigate from sources who saw and heard Jesus, what he believed to be true. This corrects the claim that Christians are not allowed to test and question their faith. We should have confidence to research our faith and the claims it makes. It can withstand scrutiny. We must of course go to valid sources and that is just what Luke did. Luke went and asked eyewitnesses who saw and heard Jesus. He likely asked some of the apostles. Luke also asked other people who were compiling accounts of Jesus too.
Let us take a second and marvel that within the first twenty years after Jesus and likely earlier than that, people were already writing down what they heard and saw. They knew it was important. And these witnesses to the gospel and recorders of what happened were already busy writing these things down and passing the message to all who believed.
Some criticism of the gospels you might hear is that the accounts were written down much later than the events. For example, Luke was written down sometime before 70 AD. That means Luke may have written his account decades after Jesus was resurrected. However, these detractors fail to realize that much of what Luke contained was from writings that had been written much closer to the event. We do see from Luke that he got his information from people who were speaking and writing with the purpose to pass down the information. His goal was to be orderly. He wanted to take all of the accounts and put them in an order that would best convey the message to his audience.

The Purpose

Luke, among many others, was investigating and researching the claims of the gospel he heard. And what did Luke find? He found that what he had received as the gospel was trustworthy. So much so that he compiled the information and underwent the difficult process of writing down all that he had learned so that he could share it. His purpose was so that Theophilus would have the same confidence in the gospel that Luke did. The gospel is not simply good information. It is good news that calls us to follow a risen Jesus. Luke is not a simple historian. He writes with a purpose to grant confidence in what has been thoroughly investigated. Luke wrote to defend this certainty to his reader. Even in the first century, God had set people about the task of writing to defend the truthfulness of what happened.

Conclusion

So with Luke, we can see the recipient, process, and purpose are all to give us confidence in the things that we believe regarding Jesus. Luke is a great book to build your confidence in what you have already learned. Luke desired to show the importance of the truthfulness of the gospel. It is not a mere story. Jesus really came, taught, died, and rose again. We can have confidence in the truthfulness of God’s word to us. God’s word has the purpose of bringing us life. So read with confidence the good news that Jesus is our Savior and many throughout the ages have gone to great lengths to ensure that we have and can trust that good news.

 

Categories
Digging Deeper into the Word Studying the Bible Uncategorized

The Spirit of the Ten Commandments

In the tapestry of human civilization, few threads have woven themselves as deeply into the fabric of societies as the Ten Commandments. These ancient directives, gifted to humanity as the backbone of God’s law, transcend mere rules; they embody the very essence of divine guidance and human flourishing. Yet, as we delve into their significance, we uncover a profound truth: while the Law is a gift that illuminates the path, it is faith in Jesus Christ that truly saves, lest anyone should boast.

Understanding the Purpose of the Law

The Scriptures are filled with insights on the function and purpose of the law. In Romans 3:20, we learn that no one is declared righteous by observing the law; rather, it serves to make us conscious of sin. This sentiment is echoed in Romans 7:7, where Paul acknowledges that he wouldn’t have recognized sin without the law’s guidance. The crux of the matter is made clear in Romans 3:28 and Galatians 2:16, emphasizing that righteousness comes through faith in Jesus, not through legalistic observance.

The Dual Purpose and Benefit of the Law

God’s intention behind the commandments is multifaceted. They are designed to teach humanity how to love God rightly, bring honor and glory to His name, and foster harmonious relationships among people (Matt. 22:40). Additionally, adherence to these commandments leads to blessings and a peaceful life, as stated in Exodus 20:1-17.

The reciprocal benefit for mankind is evident: obeying the law promotes harmony in relationships and peace in the streets. The law is a loving gift that God has revealed to His special creation to know how to love Him and one another. The Ten Commandments are a blessing that if honored will bring peace and a long life. Even if your peace is internal in the midst of external chaos, following God’s instruction leads to true life.

Man wasn’t made for the law; the law was made for man. This is exactly what Jesus meant when he described on many occasions that the spirit of the law was and is for God and man’s benefit, not their detriment. The law is not more important to God than carrying your paralyzed friend on the Sabbath. This breaking of the letter of man’s law was the exact display of love and faith that fulfilled God’s law (Mark 2:3-11).

The Transformative Power of Understanding the Spirit of the Law

Integrating the Old and New Testaments is crucial for a holistic understanding of God’s divine plan. Jesus Himself affirmed the continuity of the law and the prophets, stating that He came not to abolish but to fulfill them (Matthew 5:17). This underscores the significance of interpreting the New Testament in light of the Old, recognizing the timeless principles and moral truths encapsulated in the commandments. We must be careful to rightly interpret and discern the letter of the law as well as the spirit of the law in every area of our lives.

The Law’s Application in Real Life

Jesus’s teachings shed light on the spirit of the law. In Matthew 5 He emphasized the importance of understanding the law’s intent and living accordingly, rather than rigidly following its letter. He exemplified this in His actions, such as healing on the Sabbath, which showcased the primacy of compassion and love over legalistic adherence. In Matthew 22:36-40 Jesus says that all the Law and Prophets can be wrapped up in the essence of loving God and man with all your heart, soul, and strength. It is through Jesus’ indwelling Spirit we are able to live out the spirit of the law, applying it with wisdom and discernment.

The Spirit of the Ten Commandments

In Exodus 20:2, God tells Moses, “I am the LORD your God, who rescued you from the land of Egypt, the place of your slavery.”

The title Lord means judge, authority or ruler. God as Judge is the ultimate authority, law giver and keeper. This God is a perfect and benevolent ruler and rescuer to His people. He reminds Moses of each other’s identity, purpose, and position. The Judge then gives Moses these Ten Commandments to give to His people and to live by them.

  • “You must not have any other god but me Ex 20:3

Honor God as Lord of all (Acts 10:36). Make God primary in all areas and decisions in life. Live by His statutes, ordinances, and law and He will direct your paths.

  • “You must not make for yourself an idol Ex 20:4

Seek God alone for all your needs, desires, and comfort. He is all knowing and powerful and hallowed. He is our Father in Heaven, the only one who can graciously give our daily bread, and forgive us of our sins, and lead us out of temptation (Matthew 6:9-13)

  • “You must not misuse the name of the LORD your God.” Ex 20:7

Live in a manner worthy of your calling (Eph. 4:1). Not that God needs us to help His reputation, but we should live in a way that doesn’t contradict His character, Word or calling on our lives. Beware the way of the hypocrite.

  • “Remember to observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy.” Ex 20:8

There were many man-made laws surrounding God’s law of keeping rest on the sabbath to honor His rest and our health.

  • “Honor your father and mother.” Ex 20:12

As adults, it’s important to maintain respect for our parents by honoring them even when we disagree. Respect, care, and provide for the elderly as they have respected, cared, and provided for you. Parents, strive to live in a manner that earns respect from your children.

  • “You must not murder.” Ex 20:13

The commandment carries a profound message about the sanctity of human life. It urges us to regard life with utmost respect, regardless of circumstances like accidental or intentional harm. The essence is to honor life by exercising self-control and engaging in actions that build and uplift rather than destroy. The literal meaning of the commandment is to not murder with premeditative will. Jesus said that if you harbor anger or resentment in your heart for another person, you are guilty of murder.

  • “You must not commit adultery.” Ex 20:14

Respect and love your spouse and the commitment you’ve made. Flee sexual immorality and be true to yourself and others. If you make a vow, make every effort to keep it.

  • “You must not steal.” Ex 20:15

The eighth commandment prohibits taking what isn’t rightfully ours or harming others through unfair possession of their property. It stresses fairness, kindness, and respect for private ownership, contributing to both individual and societal well-being. This commandment serves as a reminder to live ethically even in regard to material possessions, respecting others’ rights and avoiding actions that cause harm.

  • “You must not testify falsely against your neighbor.” Ex 20:16

This commandment covers one’s words, honesty and intentions of the heart (Luke 6:45). Promote human flourishing by letting your yes be yes, and your no be no.

  • “You must not covet.” Ex 20:17

The tenth commandment promotes human and societal well-being by encouraging contentment, gratitude towards God for blessings, and honoring our neighbors. It encourages diligence and ethical conduct in business, advising against exploiting others for personal gain.

Conclusion

The spirit of the Ten Commandments extends far beyond mere legalistic observance. It embodies the fundamental principles of love, righteousness, and reverence for God and others. While the law serves as guideposts for righteous living and societal harmony, it is faith in Jesus Christ that ultimately leads to salvation and fulfills God’s purposes. By grasping the spirit behind the law, believers can navigate life with wisdom, discernment, and a genuine desire to honor God and fulfill our calling and purpose as ambassadors, and therefore an integral part in global human flourishing.

Study our free course Genesis and Exodus here.

Watch this complete lesson here.

Categories
Christian History Spiritual Development

The Principles of Deliverance

Author: Rachel Kidd

The Story of Exodus

Objective: To understand that there is no such thing as salvation without the power of God.

“The LORD is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation. He is my God, and I will praise him… and I will exalt him.” — Exodus 15:2

God’s power is uniquely displayed in the book of Exodus, which fittingly means way out. It tells the story of the Israelites’ deliverance from slavery in Egypt at the hands of Pharaoh while providing parallels to help us understand our relationship to sin and God’s ability to deliver us from it.

Deliverance

The theme of the book of Exodus is deliverance, which also means salvation, particularly in the Old Testament. We see the power of God through the salvation or deliverance of the Israelites through the plagues.

Each time Pharaoh rejected Moses and Aaron’s plea to let the Israelites go, God sent a plague on Egypt —ten in all. Everything from blood in the Nile, to hordes of locusts, frogs, lice, and flies, and finally the death of every firstborn plagued the Egyptians. After every plague, Moses and his brother Aaron come to Pharaoh and ask for the freedom of their people, in the name of the Lord. And every time, Pharaoh refused to let the Israelites go, his heart hardened.

These plagues are crucial to the story of Exodus because they convey a great truth; that God is far greater than any earthly power, even the most powerful Pharaoh at the height of Egypt’s power and influence.

He who is in you is greater than he who is in the world. —1 John 4:4

God’s power is greater than any found on earth, not a president, army, prime minister, or king. The plagues are clear evidence of this, causing the most powerful country of the time to crumble and its leader to fall to his knees, allowing this small group of enslaved people to be free.

Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron at night. He said, “Get up and go away from my people, both you and the people of Israel. Go and worship the Lord, as you have said. Take your flocks and your cattle, as you have said, and go. And pray that good will come to me also.” –Exodus 12: 31-32

Ultimately, the plagues serve to persuade Pharoah and the Egyptians, urging them to free these enslaved people and demonstrating the mighty power of God.

The Slavery of Sin

The dialogue between Moses and Pharaoh can also be seen as an illustration of the dynamic between our deliverer Jesus and Satan, who holds people in bondage, or the eternal conflict between good and evil.

God allows evil to exist to demonstrate His power to defeat it, because what is goodness without the existence of evil? Like a fine jeweler displaying their most glorious gems on a dark velvet background so they stand out, God uses sin and evil to emphasize His goodness and purity. Evil ultimately serves the purposes of God, as difficult as that is to reconcile.

An example of this can be found in this story in Exodus. God purposely hardened Pharaoh’s heart, not permitting him to let the Israelites go until the plagues escalated to death. God called Moses and Aaron to go to Pharaoh each time, asking to be set free, knowing the answer would still be a resounding “no.”

“You will speak all that I tell you. Your brother Aaron will tell Pharaoh to let the people of Israel leave his land. But I will make Pharaoh’s heart hard. So, I will do many powerful works for the people to see in the land of Egypt.” —Exodus 7: 2-3

A Deal with the Devil

As we look at the dialogue between Moses and Pharaoh, we can see what is involved in our salvation and deliverance, understanding Moses as Jesus and Pharaoh as Satan.

Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron and said, “Go and give a gift in worship to your God here in the land.” But Moses said, “It is not right to do this. For the Egyptians hate what we would give in worship to the Lord our God. If the Egyptians see us giving this gift and doing what they think is sinful, will they not throw stones at us? We must travel three days to the desert and give a gift in worship to the Lord our God, as He tells us to do.”

So, Pharaoh said, “I will let you go, so you may give a gift to the Lord your God. But do not go very far away. Pray for me.” Then Moses said, “I am leaving you. I will pray to the Lord that the many flies may leave Pharaoh and his servants and his people tomorrow. But do not let Pharaoh lie again by not letting the people go to give a gift on an altar to the Lord.” —Exodus 25-28

Satan, like Pharaoh, does not mind people being religious as long as they are still worldly, not too “churchy,” or different. They ask that you take faith lightly, to go to church on holidays but stay exactly as you were. They want us to stay in “Egypt” and remain like them, much like non-Christian friends often react to a new convert.

After the devastation of more plagues, Pharoah concedes and says that Israelites may be free, but their children must stay. If Satan cannot get access to you, he will settle for your children if you neglect to support their spiritual development, like the Pharaoh attempted to do with the Israelite children.

And after even more plagues, Pharoah concedes once more and says the Israelites can be free if they leave their livestock, the ancient equivalent of money and property. Likewise, if Satan cannot have you, he will go after your aspirations and love of money. Perhaps he can tempt you away from a calling to missions, instead drawing you into the entertainment industry and the potential of fame and fortune.

Ultimately, Satan and Pharoah are compelling and deceptive. But, God and Jesus, the deliverer, are infinitely more powerful and are the conquerors in the end.

To be free from the bondage of sin, like the bondage of the ancient Israelites in Egypt, we need a miracle of God. He devastated Pharaoh and the Egyptians with plagues, He parted the Red Sea for their escape, and He provided manna to eat as they wandered the desert.

In the same way, Jesus defeated our enemy- sin. He provided a way out of sin, and He gives us what we need to live.

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Uncategorized

Moses Learns Four Spiritual Laws

Moses Learns Four Spiritual Laws

Writer: Rachel Kidd

Objective: To learn the secrets God shared with Moses, how Moses responded to God’s call, and how we can apply them to our lives today.

Through the story of Moses, you find incredible keys to obeying God’s call upon your life. If we uncover and learn to apply these spiritual principles and practices, not only will our peace grow, but we will be sharp and true instruments in God’s hands.

Moses’ Return to Egypt

Early in the book of Exodus, we meet Moses, one of the great pillars of faith. At this point though, he’s just a man in exile.

Having run away from the problems surrounding his parentage and the murder he committed, leaving his people enslaved in Egypt, Moses is living with the Midianites. He marries a Midianite woman and becomes part of this nomadic, shepherding people under the guidance of his father-in-law Jethro, knowing he cannot return to Egypt.

Yet, in Exodus chapters 2 and 3, we see God calling Moses to return to all the problems he ran away from, to deliver his people from bondage.

This slavery in Egypt is allegorically a symbol of our slavery to sin so the deliverance from that bondage is a picture of our salvation in Christ. This also means that Moses as a deliverer is an image of any human channel of God’s work of salvation, otherwise known as an evangelist or soul-winner.

But before Moses could become the deliverer of his people, God first had to prepare him. Moses had to learn first that he was nobody, then be convinced that he was somebody, and then what God could do with somebody who knew they were nobody. It is the lesson of humility, of understanding your humanity before you can lead from a place of power and influence.

Moses said to God, “Who am I, that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?” And God said, “I will be with you. And this will be the sign to you that it is I who have sent you: When you have brought the people out of Egypt, you will worship God on this mountain. –Exodus 3:11-12

God’s secret for being the instrument of deliverance can be summed up in one statement:

“You’re not the deliverer – I am. On your own, you cannot deliver anybody. But I can, and I am with you.”

This secret is not only true of Moses; it is true for us as well.

Five Objections

Moses raised five objections when God appeared to him in the burning bush, calling him to go to Egypt.

  • “Who am I to be chosen?”
    • Moses feels unworthy of this call, to which God assures him that He will be with him, that he is worthy because he has been called, not because of who he is.
  • “I’ll be asked questions I cannot answer”
    • Moses might have been afraid of questions from the Hebrew elders who would want to understand why God would choose Moses as their deliverer. Like many of us anxious about sharing our faith, Moses was afraid he wouldn’t be able to answer the hard questions. God reassures him that he won’t need to answer or get caught up in the arguments, that He will be there and that is enough.
  • “They’ll never believe me”
    • God responds through a few object lessons, showing Moses the power of miracles in motivating and convincing people.
    • Then the Lord said to him, “What is that in your hand?” “A staff,” he replied. The Lord said, “Throw it on the ground.” Moses threw it on the ground, and it became a snake, and he ran from it. Then the Lord said to him, “Reach out your hand and take it by the tail.” So, Moses reached out and took hold of the snake and it turned back into a staff in his hand. “This,” said the Lord, “is so that they may believe that the Lord, the God of their fathers—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob—has appeared to you.” –Exodus 4:2-5
  • “I’m not eloquent enough”
    • God chose a man who wasn’t the best speaker, who maybe had a speech impediment for a reason. He didn’t want the deliverance of the Israelites to be overshadowed by a dynamic and charismatic speaker, He wanted Moses.
  • “Send somebody else”
    • Moses’ last defense makes God angry, the patience and restraint he showed thus far finally wearing thin. He tells Moses that if he wanted to send someone else, He would have; He is aware of Aaron’s speaking abilities. However, God called Moses and so Moses must go.

What was important to God was not Moses’ skills and talents, but his availability. In the work of God, the greatest ability is availability, faith, and the willingness to be used for God’s purposes, to be the vessel through which God works.

Four Spiritual Truths

God prepared Moses for leadership by teaching him four spiritual truths:

  • “I am not, but He is.”
    • God makes it clear to Moses that He is the deliverer and that He will use Moses to free the Israelites from slavery. It is not who Moses is, but who God is.
  • “I cannot, but He can.”
    • Often using failure to teach this lesson, Moses’ story is clear that Moses cannot do what he is called to do on his own or through his ability. When he takes matters into his own hands, it ends in chaos. It is only through God’s hand that the Israelites are freed through the miracles of the plagues and the parting of the Red Sea.
  • “I do not want to, but He wants to.”
    • Moses was incredibly resistant to returning to Egypt. He was living happily with the Midianites and likely could have continued living a peaceful existence there. Instead, God called him back into the storm for the greater good.
    • The men of God who are called to great things often don’t want to do them, they often say no at first.
  • “I did not but He did.”
    • It was not through Moses’ power that the Egyptians were plagued by locusts and rivers of blood, nor was it that he parted the Red Sea. It was God who orchestrated the deliverance of the Israelites and He who deserves the glory.

We object to God’s identity, calling and assignment for our lives when we forget or twist Truth. God chose you to bring freedom to the captives by proclaiming the good news of Jesus. What limitation or self-preservation are you believing has more power over you or your situation than God?

Watch this complete lesson here.